Clinical and epidemiological features of group A streptococcal bacteraemia in a region with hyperendemic superficial streptococcal infection

Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Feb;122(1):59-65. doi: 10.1017/s0950268898001952.

Abstract

Reports of increasing incidence and severity of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections come mainly from affluent populations where exposure to GAS is relatively infrequent. We conducted a 6-year retrospective review of GAS bacteraemia in the Northern Territory of Australia, comparing the Aboriginal population (24% of the study population), who have high rates of other streptococcal infections and sequelae, to the non-Aboriginal population. Of 72 episodes, 44 (61%) were in Aboriginal patients. All 12 cases in children were Aboriginal. Risk factors were implicated in 82% of episodes (91% in adults) and there was no significant difference in the proportion of Aboriginal compared to non-Aboriginal patients with at least one risk factor. Genetic typing of isolates revealed no dominant strains and no evidence of a clone which has been a common cause of these infections elsewhere.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Bacteremia / ethnology*
  • Bacteremia / microbiology*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Endemic Diseases / statistics & numerical data*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Northern Territory / epidemiology
  • Oceanic Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data*
  • Population Surveillance
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Serotyping
  • Severity of Illness Index
  • Streptococcal Infections / ethnology*
  • Streptococcal Infections / microbiology*
  • Streptococcus pyogenes / classification*