Intestinal permeability before and after ibuprofen in families of children with Crohn's disease

Can J Gastroenterol. Jan-Feb 1999;13(1):31-6. doi: 10.1155/1999/457315.

Abstract

Background: Members of a subset of first-degree relatives of adults with Crohn's disease have been shown to have an increased baseline intestinal permeability and/or an exaggerated increase in intestinal permeability after the administration of acetylsalicylic acid.

Purpose: To determine intestinal permeability in unaffected first-degree relatives of children with Crohn's disease before and after the administration of an ibuprofen challenge.

Methods: Lactulose-mannitol ratios, a measure of intestinal permeability, were determined in 14 healthy control families (41 subjects) and 14 families with a child with Crohn's disease (36 relatives, 14 probands) before and after ingestion of ibuprofen. An upper reference limit was defined using the control group as mean +/- 2 SD.

Results: The proportion of healthy, first-degree relatives with an exaggerated response to ibuprofen (20%, 95% CI 7% to 33%) was significantly higher than controls (P = 0.003). The exaggerated response was more common among siblings than among parents of pediatric probands.

Conclusions: Members of a subset of first-degree relatives of children with Crohn's disease have an exaggerated increase in intestinal permeability after ibuprofen ingestion. These findings are compatible with there being a genetic link between abnormalities of intestinal permeability and Crohn's disease.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / pharmacology*
  • Crohn Disease / genetics*
  • Crohn Disease / physiopathology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Ibuprofen / pharmacology*
  • Intestinal Absorption / drug effects*
  • Intestinal Absorption / genetics
  • Lactulose
  • Male
  • Mannitol
  • Permeability

Substances

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • Mannitol
  • Lactulose
  • Ibuprofen