Image-guided central venous catheters for apheresis

Bone Marrow Transplant. 1999 Jan;23(2):179-82. doi: 10.1038/sj.bmt.1701545.

Abstract

Apheresis is an increasingly important procedure in the treatment of a variety of conditions, sometimes performed via peripheral access because of concern over major complications associated with central venous catheter (CVC) placement. This study sought to determine the safety and success for ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided, non-tunneled dual lumen CVCs placed for apheresis. Prospective data collection was made of 200 attempted CVC placements in the radiology department utilizing real time sonographic guidance. The complications relating to placement were noted in all and the number of passes required for venepuncture and whether a single wall puncture was achieved was recorded in 185 cases. Duration of catheterization and reason for line removal were recorded in all. Our study group included 71 donors providing peripheral blood stem cells for allogeneic transplant. CVCs were successfully placed in all patients, 191 lines in the internal jugular and seven in the femoral vein. 86.5% required only a single pass and 80.5% with only anterior wall puncture. Inadvertent but clinically insignificant arterial puncture occurred in six (3%) cases. In no case did this prevent line placement. There were no other procedure-related complications. 173 (87.4%) catheters were removed the same day. No catheters were removed prematurely. There was one case of prolonged venous bleeding. Our study demonstrates the safety of central venous catheters for apheresis provided that duration of catheterization is short and real-time sonographic guidance is used for the puncture, and guide wire and catheter placement are confirmed fluoroscopically.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Angiography / methods
  • Blood Component Removal / instrumentation*
  • Catheterization, Central Venous / instrumentation*
  • Catheters, Indwelling / adverse effects
  • Female
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Humans
  • Iatrogenic Disease / prevention & control
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Ultrasonography / methods