Illness and injury in animal confinement workers

Occup Med. Apr-Jun 1999;14(2):337-50.

Abstract

Raising pigs and poultry indoors in large confinement facilities is increasingly common in U.S. agriculture. High endotoxin, ammonia, and dust levels contribute to acute and chronic respiratory symptoms in people who work in these settings. Respiratory conditions observed include the asthma-like syndrome, bronchitis, and asthma exacerbation. Organic dust toxic syndrome also has been described. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is found in a small number of those who raise poultry. Hog confinement workers are at risk of hydrogen sulfide poisoning. These and other conditions seen in confinement workers are described, and health management procedures are outlined.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Accidents, Occupational / statistics & numerical data*
  • Air Pollutants, Occupational / adverse effects
  • Air Pollutants, Occupational / analysis
  • Animal Husbandry* / statistics & numerical data
  • Animals
  • Confined Spaces*
  • Housing, Animal* / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Interior Design and Furnishings
  • Occupational Diseases / epidemiology
  • Occupational Diseases / etiology*
  • Occupational Diseases / prevention & control
  • Occupational Exposure / adverse effects
  • Occupational Exposure / analysis
  • Occupational Health*
  • Poultry
  • Respiratory Tract Diseases / epidemiology
  • Respiratory Tract Diseases / etiology*
  • Respiratory Tract Diseases / prevention & control
  • Swine
  • Ventilation
  • Wounds and Injuries / epidemiology
  • Wounds and Injuries / etiology*
  • Wounds and Injuries / prevention & control

Substances

  • Air Pollutants, Occupational