Neutrophil and Endothelial Cell Interactions in Sepsis. The Role of Adhesion Molecules

Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1999 Jun;13(2):427-47, x. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70084-2.

Abstract

Although adhesion molecules present on circulating neutrophils and endothelial cells are essential for normal host defense, generalized activation of these molecules has been implicated in the inflammatory tissue injury occurring during sepsis and septic shock. A review of both preclinical and clinical studies suggests, however, that although these molecules mediate tissue injury related to a variety of microbial and host inflammatory mediators, their predominant role during sepsis with infection is a protective one.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Bacterial Infections / immunology
  • Bacterial Infections / microbiology
  • Bacterial Infections / physiopathology*
  • Cell Adhesion / physiology
  • Cell Adhesion Molecules / drug effects
  • Cell Adhesion Molecules / metabolism
  • Cell Adhesion Molecules / physiology*
  • Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / methods
  • Endothelium / physiology*
  • Escherichia coli / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Integrins / blood
  • Integrins / metabolism
  • Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 / blood
  • Leukocyte-Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome / complications
  • Neutrophils / physiology*
  • Selectins / blood
  • Sepsis / immunology
  • Sepsis / microbiology
  • Sepsis / physiopathology*
  • Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / pharmacology

Substances

  • Cell Adhesion Molecules
  • Integrins
  • Selectins
  • Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
  • Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1