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, 400 (6739), 37-42

Sister-chromatid Separation at Anaphase Onset Is Promoted by Cleavage of the Cohesin Subunit Scc1

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Sister-chromatid Separation at Anaphase Onset Is Promoted by Cleavage of the Cohesin Subunit Scc1

F Uhlmann et al. Nature.

Abstract

Cohesion between sister chromatids is established during DNA replication and depends on a multiprotein complex called cohesin. Attachment of sister kinetochores to the mitotic spindle during mitosis generates forces that would immediately split sister chromatids were it not opposed by cohesion. Cohesion is essential for the alignment of chromosomes in metaphase but must be abolished for sister separation to start during anaphase. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of sister-chromatid cohesion depends on a separating protein (separin) called Esp1 and is accompanied by dissociation from the chromosomes of the cohesion subunit Scc1. Here we show that Esp1 causes the dissociation of Scc1 from chromosomes by stimulating its cleavage by proteolysis. A mutant Scc1 is described that is resistant to Esp1-dependent cleavage and which blocks both sister-chromatid separation and the dissociation of Scc1 from chromosomes. The evolutionary conservation of separins indicates that the proteolytic cleavage of cohesion proteins might be a general mechanism for triggering anaphase.

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