Efficacy of vision therapy for convergence insufficiency in an adult male population

J Am Optom Assoc. 1999 Apr;70(4):225-32.

Abstract

Background: Although vision therapy has reportedly been very successful in elimination of asthenopic symptoms in adults with convergence insufficiency, controlled studies have not been performed, and a clinical bias exists against prescribing vision therapy for adults with convergence insufficiency.

Methods: Sixty adult males over the age of 40 years (median age, 65 years) with convergence insufficiency were divided into three treatment groups: office-based vision therapy with supplementary home therapy, home therapy only, and a control group.

Results: Vision therapy was successful in 61.9% of patients who received in-office plus home therapy, in 30% of patients who received home therapy only, and in 10.5% of the control group. The success rate for patients who received active in-office vision therapy supplemented with home procedures was significantly greater than that for controls. Home therapy alone was less successful than in-office therapy. The success rate obtained with home therapy alone was not significantly greater than that demonstrated by controls.

Conclusions: Vision therapy is effective in eliminating asthenopia and improving convergence function in adult patients. In-office therapy combined with home therapy tends to produce better results than does home therapy alone.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Convergence, Ocular*
  • Exotropia / therapy*
  • Eyeglasses
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Sensory Deprivation
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Visual Acuity