Impact of dialysis modality and acidosis on nutritional status

ASAIO J. Sep-Oct 1999;45(5):413-7. doi: 10.1097/00002480-199909000-00009.

Abstract

Experimental evidence suggests that acidosis may have a deleterious effect on protein metabolism. We evaluated 124 chronic dialysis patients (59 +/- 17 years) and defined acidosis as an anion gap >18 meq/L. A direct correlation (p < 0.0001 was found between anion gap and serum albumin (R = 0.402), BUN (R = 0.488), and serum creatinine (R = 0.473) concentrations. Acidotic patients (43%), when compared with nonacidotic patients, had greater serum albumin concentrations (3.95 +/- 0.50 vs. 3.60 +/- 0.48 g/dl, p = 0.0001, respectively), higher normalized protein catabolic rates (1.12 +/- 0.27 vs. 0.96 +/- 0.26 g/kg/d, respectively; p = 0.0004), and higher BUN (70 +/- 19 vs. 55 +/- 17 mg/dl, p = 0.0001) and serum creatinine (11.1 +/- 3.4 vs. 8.3 +/- 3.2, p = 0.0001 mg/dl) concentrations. However, no differences in midarm muscle circumference, fat free mass, or body cell mass were noted between groups when assessed by dialysis modality or acidosis status. In conclusion, mild chronic metabolic acidosis, likely caused by increased dietary protein intake, does not independently and adversely impact nutritional status in chronic dialysis patients.

MeSH terms

  • Acid-Base Equilibrium
  • Acidosis / metabolism*
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Blood Urea Nitrogen
  • Body Composition
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nutritional Status*
  • Renal Dialysis*
  • Serum Albumin / analysis

Substances

  • Serum Albumin