A longer breast carcinoma screening interval for women age older than 65 years?

Cancer. 1999 Oct 15;86(8):1506-10. doi: 10.1002/(sici)1097-0142(19991015)86:8<1506::aid-cncr17>3.0.co;2-2.

Abstract

Background: The observed increase in sojourn time for preclinical breast carcinoma raises the question of whether women age >/= 65 years can be screened less frequently than younger women.

Methods: A cost-utility analysis using a computer model that simulates the demography, epidemiology, and natural history of breast carcinoma to estimate expected life-years gained, extra incidence, extra life-years with disease, and costs incurred by different breast carcinoma screening programs in the general population was conducted.

Results: The estimated ratio of favorable/unfavorable effects was lower for longer screening intervals compared with shorter screening intervals. The cost-effectiveness ratio was much less favorable in shorter screening intervals.

Conclusions: The results of the current analysis showed that although a longer sojourn time for preclinical breast carcinoma should not necessarily be accompanied by a longer screening interval, a shorter screening interval was not very efficient.

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis*
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Mammography / economics
  • Mammography / methods
  • Mass Screening / economics
  • Mass Screening / methods*
  • Middle Aged
  • Time Factors