Screening mammography rates by specialty of the usual care physician

Eff Clin Pract. May-Jun 1999;2(3):120-5.

Abstract

Context: Although Medicare began paying for screening mammography in 1991, utilization among enrollees has been low.

Practice pattern examined: The relation between the specialty of the usual care physician and the proportion of women 65 years of age and older receiving mammography.

Data source: 100% Medicare Part B claims for 186,526 female enrollees residing in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont during 1993 and 1994.

Results: Among women of the target screening age (65 to 69 years), 55.4%, received mammography during the 2-year period. The highest rates of mammography were observed in women whose usual care physician was a gynecologist (77.9%; 95% CI, 75.8 to 79.9), followed by those treated by an internist (67.1%; CI, 66.5 to 67.7), family practitioner (58.1%; CI, 57.4 to 58.9), general practitioner (47.4%; CI, 45.4 to 49.5), and other specialists (41.3%; CI, 40.1 to 42.5). The lowest rates were observed in women who had no physician visits during the 2-year period (9.5%; CI, 8.7 to 10.4). Although screening rates were lower in women aged 70 years and older, a similar pattern was observed.

Conclusions: The probability of a Medicare enrollee's receiving screening mammography is strongly influenced by the specialty of her usual care physician. Covering a preventive service does not guarantee its use.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Breast Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • Breast Neoplasms / prevention & control
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S.
  • Female
  • Health Care Surveys
  • Health Services Research
  • Humans
  • Maine
  • Mammography / statistics & numerical data*
  • Medicare
  • Medicine / statistics & numerical data*
  • New Hampshire
  • Outcome Assessment, Health Care
  • Practice Patterns, Physicians' / statistics & numerical data*
  • Specialization*
  • United States
  • Vermont