Prevalence of normal-tension glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma in patients with collagen diseases

Jpn J Ophthalmol. Nov-Dec 1999;43(6):539-42. doi: 10.1016/s0021-5155(99)00142-2.

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in patients with collagen diseases and determine whether an immunocompromised condition is present in a subset of glaucoma patients.

Methods: Three glaucoma specialists prospectively examined patients with collagen diseases. The diagnostic process included applanation tonometry, slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, direct ophthalmoscopy, and automated static perimetry. Twenty-four-hour intraocular pressure monitoring was done when necessary. Using the results of a population-based survey conducted in Japan, we calculated an expected number of cases of NTG and POAG, and compared these with the actual number of cases.

Results: Of the 153 patients with collagen diseases examined, we found 6 patients with NTG and 2 patients with POAG. Of these 8 patients, 2 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), one with NTG, and the other, POAG, had a history of being on systemic steroidal therapy. The prevalence of NTG and POAG was significantly higher in women patients having collagen diseases as compared with normal women (P = .027).

Conclusion: Women patients with collagen diseases are highly susceptible to NTG and POAG.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Antibodies, Antinuclear / analysis
  • Chronic Disease
  • Collagen Diseases / epidemiology*
  • Collagen Diseases / immunology
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Glaucoma, Open-Angle / epidemiology*
  • Glaucoma, Open-Angle / immunology
  • Humans
  • Intraocular Pressure
  • Japan / epidemiology
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Population Surveillance
  • Prevalence
  • Prospective Studies
  • Scleroderma, Systemic / epidemiology*
  • Scleroderma, Systemic / immunology
  • Sex Factors

Substances

  • Antibodies, Antinuclear