Unraveling the role of proteases in cancer

Clin Chim Acta. 2000 Feb 15;291(2):113-35. doi: 10.1016/s0009-8981(99)00224-7.

Abstract

Investigators have been studying the expression and activity of proteases in the final steps of tumor progression, invasion and metastasis, for the past 30 years. Recent studies, however, indicate that proteases are involved earlier in progression, e.g., in tumor growth both at the primary and metastatic sites. Extracellular proteases may co-operatively influence matrix degradation and tumor cell invasion through proteolytic cascades, with individual proteases having distinct roles in tumor growth, invasion, migration and angiogenesis. In this review, we use cathepsin B as an example to examine the involvement of proteases in tumor progression and metastasis. We discuss the effect of interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and the extracellular matrix on the regulation of protease expression. Further elucidation of the role of proteases in cancer will allow us to design more effective inhibitors and novel protease-based drugs for clinical use.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Endopeptidases / metabolism*
  • Extracellular Matrix / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Hydrolysis
  • Neoplasms / enzymology*
  • Neoplasms / pathology
  • Precancerous Conditions / enzymology

Substances

  • Endopeptidases