A Step Ahead. Infant Protection Through Maternal Immunization

Pediatr Clin North Am. 2000 Apr;47(2):449-63. doi: 10.1016/s0031-3955(05)70217-0.

Abstract

The concept of maternal immunization to prevent infectious diseases during a period of increased vulnerability in infants is not new and is supported by historical experience and carefully conducted studies of various viral and bacterial vaccines. Candidate vaccines should be minimally reactogenic, immunogenic, and safe for maternal immunization to be considered as a disease prevention strategy. The possibilities increase as more potential candidate vaccines for use during pregnancy become available, including conjugate meningococcal vaccines, parainfluenza virus type 3 purified subunit vaccines, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, and HIV vaccines. Additional research on the safety and efficacy of maternal immunization must continue to effect the development of infectious diseases in neonates and infants.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Bacterial Vaccines* / administration & dosage
  • Female
  • Haemophilus Vaccines
  • Humans
  • Immunity, Maternally-Acquired*
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Newborn, Diseases / prevention & control*
  • Influenza Vaccines
  • Pneumococcal Infections / prevention & control
  • Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated
  • Pregnancy
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections / prevention & control
  • Rubella Vaccine
  • Vaccines, Conjugate
  • Viral Hepatitis Vaccines
  • Viral Vaccines* / administration & dosage

Substances

  • Bacterial Vaccines
  • Haemophilus Vaccines
  • Influenza Vaccines
  • Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated
  • Rubella Vaccine
  • Vaccines, Conjugate
  • Viral Hepatitis Vaccines
  • Viral Vaccines