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Comparative Study
, 60 (7), 2049-55

BCR-ABL Tyrosine Kinase Activity Regulates the Expression of Multiple Genes Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

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  • PMID: 10766197
Comparative Study

BCR-ABL Tyrosine Kinase Activity Regulates the Expression of Multiple Genes Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

M W Deininger et al. Cancer Res.

Abstract

The BCR-ABL chimeric protein is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome-positive leukemias, notably chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). There is compelling evidence that malignant transformation by BCR-ABL is critically dependent on its protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity. As a result, multiple signaling pathways are activated in a kinase-dependent manner, and thus the activation of such pathways may affect the expression of genes that confer the malignant phenotype. In this study, we used differential display to investigate the alterations of gene expression in BV173, a CML cell line derived from lymphoid blast crisis, after exposure to ST1571, which selectively inhibits ABL PTK activity. We show that the expression of a set of 12 genes is correlated with the kinase activity and that the profile of these genes reflects mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of CML. Several of the genes show a consistent pattern of altered regulation in all Ph-positive lymphoid cell lines, whereas others appear to be unique to BV173 cells. We conclude that BCR-ABL PTK activity drives the expression of specific target genes that contribute to the malignant transformation of Ph-positive cells. The identification of downstream molecules with a consistent regulation pattern may provide suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in the future.

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