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Review
, 97 (9), 4414-6

Brain Growth and the Cognitive Map

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Review

Brain Growth and the Cognitive Map

A Terrazas et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Structural studies of the brain, past and present. (a) Phrenologist's map from the end of the 18th century. Bumps on the skull were thought to reflect the size of the underlying brain. [Reproduced with permission from John van Whye, The History of Phrenology on the Web (http://www.jmvanwyhe.freeserve.co.uk), March 20, 2000. Originally published in The Philosophical Magazine (1802), Vol. 14.] (b) Example of voxel-based morphology as used in the Maguire et al. (1) study. From top to bottom, T1-weighted anatomical image in a sagittal plane containing the hippocampus, segmented gray matter from the same image, and segmented white matter from the same image. [Images courtesy of Timothy M. Ellmore, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD.]
Figure 2
Figure 2
Multistability of place representation in old rats. Parallel recordings of single units in hippocampal area CA1 made on two consecutive experiences of a “Figure 8” maze (Maze 1, Maze 2; see figure 8 of ref. 18) for one old and one young rat. Between each recording session, the rats were removed from the room. Each color represents the spikes of a single unit recorded as the rat traversed the maze. The rat's movements through the maze are represented by the underlying gray traces. For the young rat, the spatial representation is highly consistent between visits. In contrast, the older rat exhibits an almost complete redistribution of the firing fields between the two visits. [Reproduced with permission from Barnes et al. (1997) Nature (London) 388, 272–275 (Copyright 1997, Macmillan Magazines Ltd).]

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