The additive and interactive effects of parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems of children of divorce

J Clin Child Psychol. 2000 Jun;29(2):232-44. doi: 10.1207/S15374424jccp2902_9.

Abstract

Investigated the interaction between parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems in children of divorce. The study utilized a sample of 231 mothers and children, 9 to 12 years old, who had experienced divorce within the previous 2 years. Both mothers' and children's reports on parenting, temperament, and adjustment variables were obtained and combined to create cross-reporter measures of the variables. Parenting and temperament were directly and independently related to outcomes consistent with an additive model of their effects. Significant interactions indicated that parental rejection was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children low in positive emotionality, and inconsistent discipline was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children high in impulsivity. These findings suggest that children who are high in impulsivity may be at greater risk for developing problems, whereas positive emotionality may operate as a protective factor, decreasing the risk of adjustment problems in response to negative parenting.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Adjustment Disorders / etiology*
  • Adjustment Disorders / psychology
  • Adult
  • Child
  • Divorce / psychology*
  • Emotions
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mother-Child Relations*
  • Parenting
  • Risk Factors
  • Temperament*