Effects of the dimethyl ester on succinic acid on the hormonal and metabolic response to exercise in hereditarily diabetic starved rats

Cell Biochem Funct. 2000 Sep;18(3):153-60. doi: 10.1002/1099-0844(200009)18:3<153::AID-CBF858>3.0.CO;2-Q.

Abstract

This study was designed to assess the effect of the dimethyl ester of succinic acid (SAD) upon the hormonal and metabolic response to a 60-min exercise in overnight-starved Goto-Kakizaki rats. Twenty Goto-Kakizaki rats were starved overnight and then either maintained at rest or obliged to swim for 60 min. Half of the rats were injected intraperitoneally with the dimethyl ester of succinic acid (SAD, 5.0 micromol g(-1) body wt) immediately before exercise (or 60 min of rest). In the hereditarily diabetic rats, overnight starvation lowered the plasma D- glucose, insulin and lactate concentrations, while increasing that of free fatty acids and beta-hydroxybutyrate. In resting rats, the injection of SAD increased the glycogen content of liver, heart and muscle and the plasma concentration of D-glucose, insulin, glycerol and free fatty acids. In control animals, not injected with SAD, exercise increased the plasma concentration of D- glucose, lactate and glycerol, whilst lowering both that of insulin and the glycogen content of liver, heart and muscle. The injection of SAD before exercise failed to prevent and, on occasion, even accentuated the changes in both the glycogen content of liver, heart and muscle and the plasma concentration of D-glucose, insulin, glycerol and free fatty acids, whilst minimizing the increase in lactate concentration otherwise caused by exercise. Nevertheless, the comparison between resting and exercising rats, both injected with SAD, suggested that the ester abolished the exercise-induced rise in D-glucose, glycerol and fatty acid concentrations. By comparison with comparable experiments conducted in overnight-starved normal rats, these findings emphasize both the difference between normal and diabetic rats in their metabolic response to exercise, especially in terms of changes in glycemia, and the usefulness of SAD to compensate for the increased consumption of endogenous nutrients during exercise.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid / blood
  • Animals
  • Body Weight / drug effects
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / genetics
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental / metabolism*
  • Fatty Acids, Nonesterified / blood
  • Food Deprivation
  • Glucose / metabolism
  • Glycerol / blood
  • Glycogen / biosynthesis
  • Insulin / blood
  • Lactic Acid / blood
  • Liver / metabolism
  • Male
  • Muscles / metabolism
  • Myocardium / metabolism
  • Organ Size / drug effects
  • Physical Conditioning, Animal*
  • Rats
  • Rats, Mutant Strains
  • Succinates / chemistry*
  • Succinates / pharmacology

Substances

  • Fatty Acids, Nonesterified
  • Insulin
  • Succinates
  • Lactic Acid
  • Glycogen
  • dimethyl succinate
  • Glucose
  • Glycerol
  • 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid