Incidence of severe unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning differs across racial/ethnic categories

Public Health Rep. 2000 Jan-Feb;115(1):46-51. doi: 10.1093/phr/115.1.46.

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the incidence of severe, acute, unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning differs across racial/ethnic categories.

Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of all Washington State residents treated with hyperbaric oxygen for severe, acute, unintentional CO poisoning from December 1, 1987, through February 28, 1997.

Results: Among 586 Washington State residents treated with hyperbaric oxygen for severe, acute, unintentional CO poisoning, racial/ethnic designations could be determined from record review for 530 (90%). The black and Hispanic white populations of Washington State had higher relative risks for severe, acute, unintentional CO poisoning than the non-Hispanic white population. The most common sources of CO poisoning differed by racial/ethnic category.

Conclusions: Members of certain groups in Washington State are at higher risk for severe, unintentional CO poisoning. Public education programs regarding CO exposure should be targeted to populations at risk.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning / epidemiology*
  • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning / therapy
  • Ethnicity*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Hyperbaric Oxygenation
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Racial Groups*
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Washington / epidemiology