Effect of an Administrative Intervention on Rates of Screening for Domestic Violence in an Urban Emergency Department

Am J Public Health. 2000 Sep;90(9):1444-8. doi: 10.2105/ajph.90.9.1444.

Abstract

Objectives: This study measured the effects of an administrative intervention on health care provider compliance with universal domestic violence screening protocols.

Methods: We used a simple, interrupted-time-series design in a stratified random sample of female emergency department patients 18 years or older (n = 1638 preintervention, n = 1617 postintervention). The intervention was a 4-tiered hospital-approved disciplinary action, and the primary outcome was screening compliance.

Results: Preintervention and postintervention screening rates were 29.5% and 72.8%, respectively. Before the intervention, screening was worse on the night shift (odds ratio [OR] = 0.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31, 0.68) and with psychiatric patients (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.14, 0.85); after the intervention, no previous screening barriers remained significant.

Conclusions: An administrative intervention significantly enhanced compliance with universal domestic violence screening.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Controlled Clinical Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Emergency Service, Hospital
  • Emergency Treatment / nursing*
  • Employee Discipline / methods*
  • Female
  • Guideline Adherence*
  • Hospitals, Urban
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Mass Screening / statistics & numerical data*
  • Mental Disorders / complications
  • Middle Aged
  • Night Care / standards
  • Nursing Assessment / standards*
  • Nursing Staff, Hospital / education*
  • Nursing Staff, Hospital / psychology
  • Odds Ratio
  • Organizational Policy
  • Practice Guidelines as Topic*
  • Quality Assurance, Health Care
  • Spouse Abuse / diagnosis*
  • Trauma Centers