Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2000 Sep 26;97(20):11020-5.
doi: 10.1073/pnas.190291097.

Modifications of Retinal Neurons in a Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Modifications of Retinal Neurons in a Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

E Strettoi et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Animal models of retinitis pigmentosa include the rd mouse, in which a mutation of a rod-specific phosphodiesterase leads to the rapid loss of photoreceptors during the early postnatal life. Very little is known about changes occurring in inner retinal neurons after photoreceptor loss. These changes are important in view of the possibility of restoring vision in retinas with photoreceptor degeneration by means of cell transplantation or direct stimulation of inner layers. In this paper, we show that bipolar and horizontal cells of the rd mouse retina undergo dramatic morphological modifications accompanying photoreceptor loss, demonstrating a dependence of second order neurons on these cells. While describing modifications of the rd retina, we also provide quantitative information about neurons of the wild-type mouse retina, useful for future studies on genetically altered animals.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Rod bipolar cells. PKC staining in wt (A) and rd (B) retinas in vertical sections. Dendrites, pointed out by arrows in A, are totally absent in B. Unless specified, illustrations have been obtained from retinas of animals ranging between 2 and 3 months of age. (Bar is 20 μm in this and subsequent figures.)
Figure 2
Figure 2
Lack of dendrites in rod bipolar cells. Immunostaining with a different antiserum (L7) confirms that rod bipolars have no processes in the OPL. (A) wt retina; (B) rd retina. Arrows in A indicate dendrites.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Density curves of rod bipolars cells (Left) and horizontal cells (Right). Data are from three wt and rd adult retinas. Black solid lines represent average curves. Notice the sizeable decrease in rod bipolar density in central rd retinas.
Figure 4
Figure 4
PKC staining of rd and wt young retinas (P10 and P20). (A–D) Confocal images obtained at different depths in whole-mounted retinas. Rod bipolar dendrites are scant and scarcely differentiated in the P10, rd retina (A), although they tile richly the OPL in the wt (B). There are not appreciable differences in the staining of rod bipolar cell bodies of rd and wt retinas (B and C). (E and F) Vertical sections of rd and wt retinas at the age of P20. Dendrites of rod bipolar cells in the wt (F) are well differentiated (arrows); in age-matched rd retinas they are limited to a rudimental border (arrow in E).
Figure 5
Figure 5
Glutamate metabotropic receptor. Double labeling for PKC (green) and mGluR6 (red) in wt (A) and rd (B) retinas in vertical sections. Immunoreactivity for mGluR6 in the OPL of the rd retina appears decreased; rod bipolar axons also are stained (arrows in B).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Whole-mount staining for mGluR6. Compare the OPL of wt retina (A) to the OPL of rd retina (B). In B, immunoreactivity appears clustered in dense bodies. The fine punctate labeling visible in A has been lost. In the rd retina, individual bipolar axons are also stained in the INL (C).
Figure 7
Figure 7
Calbindin staining of horizontal cell bodies. Vertical sections of wt (A) and rd retinas (B). In this view it is easy to appreciate the loss of processes emerging from horizontal cell bodies. Several amacrines and ganglion cells are stained for calbindin in both A and B.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Whole-mount staining with neurofilament antibodies. Compare the tight network made by horizontal cell axonal endings in the OPL of wt retinas (A) to the loose arrangements of hypertrophic process in the rd (B).

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 105 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback