Sertraline in the treatment of major depression following mild traumatic brain injury

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. Spring 2000;12(2):226-32. doi: 10.1176/jnp.12.2.226.

Abstract

An 8-week, nonrandomized, single-blind, placebo run-in trial of sertraline was conducted on 15 patients diagnosed with major depression between 3 and 24 months after a mild traumatic brain injury. On the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, 13 (87%) had a decrease in score of > or = 50% ("response"), and 10 (67%) achieved a score of < or = 7 ("remission") by week 8 of sertraline. There was statistically significant improvement in psychological distress, anger and aggression, functioning, and postconcussive symptoms with treatment.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation / therapeutic use*
  • Brain Concussion / complications*
  • Brain Concussion / psychology
  • Depressive Disorder / drug therapy*
  • Depressive Disorder / etiology*
  • Depressive Disorder / psychology
  • Female
  • Health Status Indicators
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pilot Projects
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors / therapeutic use*
  • Sertraline / therapeutic use*
  • Sickness Impact Profile

Substances

  • Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation
  • Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
  • Sertraline