Current uses of monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of acute leukemia

Semin Oncol. 2000 Oct;27(5):531-9.

Abstract

Advances in the treatment of acute leukemia have been limited by both disease resistance and toxicity. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as a means of targeting therapy to malignant cells in the form of antibody-mediated cellular toxicity, radiation, or other cytotoxic agents. Anti-CD33 and anti-CD45 antibodies have been most extensively studied. Antibodies conjugated with either radioisotopes or cytotoxic moieties have been used as part of stem cell transplant regimens or as induction therapy in patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and have demonstrated antileukemic activity with acceptable toxicities.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Acute Disease
  • Antibodies, Monoclonal / therapeutic use*
  • Antigens, CD
  • Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Humans
  • Immunoconjugates / therapeutic use*
  • Leukemia / drug therapy*
  • Leukocyte Common Antigens
  • Radiopharmaceuticals / therapeutic use
  • Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3

Substances

  • Antibodies, Monoclonal
  • Antigens, CD
  • Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic
  • CD33 protein, human
  • Immunoconjugates
  • Radiopharmaceuticals
  • Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3
  • Leukocyte Common Antigens