Update on topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2001 Apr;12(2):88-93. doi: 10.1097/00055735-200104000-00002.

Abstract

Topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are a novel addition to the armamentarium of medical glaucoma treatment; dorzolamide has been available since 1995 and brinzolamide since 1998. They lower intraocular pressure by inhibiting carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme for aqueous humor formation. Intraocular pressure-lowering activity of the substances appears to be the same and is similar to that of most other agents, but it does not reach the activity of the unselective beta-blocker timolol or the prostaglandin latanoprost. On concomitant treatment, additivity is reached with all other topical agents. A possible improvement of blood flow may offer an additional benefit, but its significance for the long-term outcome for human glaucoma remains to be shown. Side effects are mostly local. A more physiologic pH of brinzolamide appears to be advantageous.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Antihypertensive Agents / administration & dosage
  • Aqueous Humor / enzymology*
  • Blood Flow Velocity / drug effects
  • Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors / administration & dosage*
  • Carbonic Anhydrases / drug effects
  • Carbonic Anhydrases / metabolism*
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Eye / blood supply
  • Glaucoma / drug therapy*
  • Glaucoma / enzymology
  • Glaucoma / physiopathology
  • Humans
  • Intraocular Pressure / drug effects
  • Latanoprost
  • Ophthalmic Solutions
  • Prostaglandins F, Synthetic / administration & dosage
  • Sulfonamides / administration & dosage
  • Thiazines / administration & dosage
  • Thiophenes / administration & dosage

Substances

  • Antihypertensive Agents
  • Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors
  • Ophthalmic Solutions
  • Prostaglandins F, Synthetic
  • Sulfonamides
  • Thiazines
  • Thiophenes
  • Latanoprost
  • brinzolamide
  • dorzolamide
  • Carbonic Anhydrases