The deep posterior compartmental syndrome of the leg

J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1975 Jan;57(1):34-9.

Abstract

Fourteen cases of deep posterior compartmental syndrome of the leg complicating lower-extremity trauma were analyzed. Caused by increased pressure within the deep posterior compartment, the syndrome was characterized by pain, plantar hypesthesia, weakness of toe flexion, pain on passive toe extension, and tenseness of the fascia between the tibia and the triceps surae in the distal medial part of the leg. Decompression of the compartment within twelve hours of the onset of the syndrome prevented permanent sequelae.

Publication types

  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Ankle Injuries
  • Calcaneus / injuries
  • Casts, Surgical / adverse effects
  • Child, Preschool
  • Fasciotomy
  • Female
  • Fibula / injuries
  • Fractures, Bone / complications
  • Humans
  • Hypesthesia / etiology
  • Ischemia / complications
  • Leg / blood supply*
  • Male
  • Muscles / blood supply
  • Muscular Diseases / etiology*
  • Muscular Diseases / surgery
  • Pain / etiology
  • Postoperative Complications
  • Syndrome
  • Talus / injuries
  • Tibial Fractures / complications
  • Vascular Diseases / surgery
  • Wounds, Gunshot / complications