Interactions between monoamines, glutamate, and GABA in schizophrenia: new evidence

Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol. 2001;41:237-60. doi: 10.1146/annurev.pharmtox.41.1.237.

Abstract

In spite of its proven heuristic value, the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia is now yielding to a multifactorial view, in which the other monoamines as well as glutamate and GABA are included, with a focus on neurotransmitter interactions in complex neurocircuits. The primary lesion(s) in schizophrenia does not necessarily involve any of these neurotransmitters directly but could deal with a more general defect, such as a faulty connectivity of developmental origin. Nevertheless, a precise identification of neurotransmitter aberrations in schizophrenia will probably provide clues for a better understanding of the disease and for the development of new treatment and prevention strategies.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antipsychotic Agents / pharmacology
  • Antipsychotic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Biogenic Monoamines / physiology*
  • Brain Chemistry / physiology
  • Dopamine / physiology
  • Glutamic Acid / physiology*
  • Humans
  • Schizophrenia / drug therapy
  • Schizophrenia / metabolism
  • Schizophrenia / physiopathology*
  • gamma-Aminobutyric Acid / physiology*

Substances

  • Antipsychotic Agents
  • Biogenic Monoamines
  • Glutamic Acid
  • gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
  • Dopamine