Emergence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci

Emerg Infect Dis. Mar-Apr 2001;7(2):183-7. doi: 10.3201/eid0702.010205.

Abstract

Vancomycin and ampicillin resistance in clinical Enterococcus faecium strains has developed in the past decade. Failure to adhere to strict infection control to prevent the spread of these pathogens has been well established. New data implicate the use of specific classes of antimicrobial agents in the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Extended-spectrum cephalosporins and drugs with potent activity against anaerobic bacteria may promote infection and colonization with VRE and may exert different effects on the initial establishment and persistence of high-density colonization. Control of VRE will require better understanding of the mechanisms by which different classes of drugs promote gastrointestinal colonization.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Ampicillin Resistance
  • Animals
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology*
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use
  • Communicable Diseases, Emerging / drug therapy*
  • Communicable Diseases, Emerging / epidemiology
  • Communicable Diseases, Emerging / microbiology
  • Drug Resistance, Multiple*
  • Enterococcus faecium / drug effects*
  • Enterococcus faecium / growth & development
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / drug therapy*
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / epidemiology
  • Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections / microbiology
  • Humans
  • Risk Factors
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Vancomycin / pharmacology*
  • Vancomycin Resistance*

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Vancomycin