Racial differences in eating disorder attitudes, cigarette, and alcohol use

Am J Health Behav. Mar-Apr 2001;25(2):83-99. doi: 10.5993/ajhb.25.2.1.

Abstract

Objective: To compare eating disorder attitudes, cigarette, and alcohol use between black and white college women.

Method: Four validated, self-report questionnaires were administered.

Results: Black women reported significantly less substance use. However, substance use, regardless of race, was significantly related to eating disorder symptoms, and women at highest risk for an eating disorder reported the highest levels of substance use. Also significantly related to eating disorder symptoms were negative affect reduction and weight control as reasons for substance use.

Conclusions: Black and white women at highest risk for an eating disorder also exhibit the greatest potential for substance use.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • African Americans / psychology*
  • African Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology
  • Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / psychology*
  • European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
  • Feeding and Eating Disorders / epidemiology*
  • Female
  • Health Behavior / ethnology*
  • Humans
  • Personality Inventory
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Students / psychology*
  • Students / statistics & numerical data
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Universities