Incisional hernia in gynecologic oncology patients: a 10-year study

Obstet Gynecol. 2001 May;97(5 Pt 1):696-700. doi: 10.1016/s0029-7844(01)01192-9.

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the independent contribution of clinical and constitutional factors in the development of early and late incisional hernias in women undergoing surgery for uterine cancer.

Methods: Over 10 years, patients undergoing extended abdominal hysterectomy for cervical or endometrial malignancies through a vertical incision were followed for the identification of incisional hernias. Logistic regression and survival analyses were used for statistics.

Results: Four hundred fifty-five women were included in the study, 77 of whom (16.9%) developed incisional hernias. The median (range) body mass index was higher in women who developed an incisional hernia than in those who did not (28 [19--44] kg/m(2) versus 24 [16--41] kg/m(2); P <.01). The frequencies of diabetes (14.3% versus 4.8%; P <.01), wound sepsis (10.4% versus 1.3%; P <.05), and fascial closure with interrupted sutures (70.1% versus 55.6%; P <.05) were significantly higher in women with incisional hernia than in those without. Multiple logistic regression revealed that, after adjustment for confounding variables, the only factors associated with incisional hernia formation within 1 year from the operation were body mass index above 27 kg/m(2) (odds ratio [OR] 3.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38, 9.81; P <.01) and wound infection (OR 5.05; 95% CI 1.39, 18.37; P <.01), whereas the factors associated with incisional hernia formation at least 3 years after surgery were diabetes (OR 6.68; 95% CI 2.02, 22; P <.01) and wound infection (OR 8.55; 95% CI 1.54, 47.5; P <.01). For hernia developing after 5 years (OR 8.32; 95% CI 1.41, 55.65; P <.05) and 8 years (OR 49.52; 95% CI 2.72, 907.14; P <.01), the only significant association was found with diabetes.

Conclusion: Late incisional hernia formation does not depend on conditions present at the time of operation or on surgical technique. Other factors such as diabetes seem to play an important role in the development of late incisional hernia.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Age Distribution
  • Aged
  • Confidence Intervals
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Hernia, Ventral / epidemiology*
  • Hernia, Ventral / etiology*
  • Humans
  • Hysterectomy / adverse effects*
  • Hysterectomy / methods*
  • Incidence
  • Logistic Models
  • Middle Aged
  • Odds Ratio
  • Probability
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk Factors
  • Uterine Neoplasms / diagnosis
  • Uterine Neoplasms / surgery*