Lung cancer in the octogenarian

Gerontology. 2001 May-Jun;47(3):158-60. doi: 10.1159/000052790.

Abstract

Background: Older patients with lung cancer tend to have significant coexisting diseases and less aggressive treatment is often advisable.

Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological features of lung cancer in patients aged 80 years and over.

Methods: The medical records of 966 patients with lung cancer between 1976 and 1999 were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: There were 56 (5.8%) patients 80 years old or over. Thirty-nine (70%) were male, and 22 (39%) patients had poor performance status (2-4). Some of the patients had a medical history of cardiovascular disease (n = 23; 41%), cerebrovascular disease (n = 5; 9%), diabetes mellitus (n = 11; 20%), or malignant disease (n = 8; 14%). Twenty-one (35%) patients were diagnosed as having surgically resectable disease and 20 patients underwent radiotherapy, but 25 patients only received supportive care because of concomitant illnesses. Only 9 and 2 patients, respectively, had chemotherapy and surgery. There was no statistical difference in the survival rate of the two groups of patients receiving radiotherapy or supportive care.

Conclusion: Adequate palliative care to provide prolonged quality survival is an appropriate primary goal of therapy for lung cancer in the octogenarian until less invasive treatments are developed.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology
  • Comorbidity
  • Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Japan / epidemiology
  • Lung Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Lung Neoplasms / pathology
  • Lung Neoplasms / therapy
  • Male
  • Neoplasm Staging
  • Palliative Care / methods*
  • Probability
  • Prognosis
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Assessment
  • Risk Factors
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Statistics, Nonparametric
  • Survival Analysis