Arterial complications and total knee arthroplasty

J Am Acad Orthop Surg. Jul-Aug 2001;9(4):253-7. doi: 10.5435/00124635-200107000-00005.

Abstract

Arterial complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are rare; however, the sequelae can be disastrous. Infection and the need for amputation or vascular reconstructive surgery are not uncommon. A thorough preoperative assessment can identify at-risk patients, many, if not all, of whom have preexisting peripheral arterial disease. In the presence of peripheral arterial disease, the use of a tourniquet during TKA has been implicated in subsequent arterial complications. Following the guidelines that have been established regarding preoperative assessment, the role of the vascular surgeon, and the use of a tourniquet before and during TKA can assist the orthopaedic surgeon in assessing candidates for TKA and reducing the risk of arterial complications.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Arterial Occlusive Diseases / etiology
  • Arteries / injuries*
  • Arteriovenous Fistula / etiology
  • Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee / adverse effects*
  • Femoral Artery / diagnostic imaging
  • Femoral Artery / injuries
  • Humans
  • Leg / blood supply*
  • Leg / diagnostic imaging
  • Popliteal Artery / diagnostic imaging
  • Popliteal Artery / injuries
  • Postoperative Complications / diagnosis
  • Postoperative Complications / etiology
  • Postoperative Complications / prevention & control
  • Preoperative Care / methods
  • Radiography
  • Risk Factors
  • Thrombosis / etiology
  • Tourniquets / adverse effects
  • Vascular Diseases / diagnosis
  • Vascular Diseases / etiology*
  • Vascular Diseases / prevention & control
  • Wounds, Nonpenetrating / diagnosis
  • Wounds, Nonpenetrating / etiology*
  • Wounds, Nonpenetrating / prevention & control