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, 126 (6), 526-34

[Esophagectomy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus Isolated or Associated With Head and Neck Cancer: Long-Term Survival]

[Article in French]
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[Esophagectomy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus Isolated or Associated With Head and Neck Cancer: Long-Term Survival]

[Article in French]
M H Roullet et al. Ann Chir.

Abstract

Study aim: Esophageal squamous cell carcinomas are frequently associated with head and neck cancers. This retrospective study was conducted to compare the long-term outcome of the patients with a double cancer and of the patients with a solitary esophageal cancer after curative management.

Patients and methods: From 1989 to 1999, 114 patients with an esophageal carcinoma were included in the study. Among them, 52 had an associated head and neck cancer (metachronous: n = 17 and synchronous: n = 35). Curative treatment was achieved in all patients. The patients were divided in "solitary" and "associated" group.

Results: Age, sex distribution, tumor location and histological findings were similar in the two groups. The esophageal resection was an esopharyngolaryngectomy (n = 13), a subtotal esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis (n = 92) and a Lewis-Santy esophagectomy with thoracic anastomosis (n = 9). Operative mortality (8 versus 7.7%), anastomotic leaks rate (14.5 versus 21%) and pneumonia rate (21 versus 9.6%) were not significantly different in the two groups. The mean hospital stay was 27 days. The mean follow-up was 85 +/- 50 months. Five-year survival rates were not significantly different in the two groups (p = 0.6411). In univariate survival analysis the only significant predictive factors were the depth of esophageal tumor invasion (p = 0.0002) and node involvement (p = 0.0373). The presence of head and neck cancer did not affect survival after esophagectomy.

Conclusion: With an aggressive therapeutic plan, the survival of patients with an esophageal cancer associated to head and neck cancer was similar to the survival of patients with an isolated esophageal carcinoma. Long term esophageal survey seems to be useful to detect more superficial esophageal carcinomas in patients with head and neck cancer.

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