Botulinum toxin A: a new option for treatment of drooling in children with cerebral palsy. Presentation of a case series

Eur J Pediatr. 2001 Aug;160(8):509-12. doi: 10.1007/s004310100784.

Abstract

Drooling beyond the age of 4 years is pathological, particularly if it occurs in children with neurological and developmental impairment and disability. Considering the therapeutic spectrum of botulinum toxin A and in view of the innervation of the salivary glands, we postulated that intraglandular injections into the submandibular glands with botulinum toxin A could reduce the secretion of saliva and consequently decrease drooling. Three patients with cerebral palsy and severe drooling were selected and evaluated over a 4-month period. Under ultrasound guidance, one dose of botulinum toxin A was injected bilaterally into the submandibular glands. Saliva secretion was measured at baseline and repeated four times during the following 4 months. In the three patients, maximal salivary flow rate of the sublingual and submandibular glands was reduced by 51% to 63%. The time of the maximal effect differed among the three children. The parents reported a satisfactory reduction of drooling throughout the whole study period. No objectionable disturbances of oral functions were observed. There was mild transient thickening of saliva in one of the patients.

Conclusion: The application of botulinum toxin A to the submandibular gland is a promising technique to reduce salivary flow rate and probably an alternative in the treatment of drooling in children with cerebral palsy.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Botulinum Toxins, Type A / administration & dosage
  • Botulinum Toxins, Type A / therapeutic use*
  • Cerebral Palsy / complications*
  • Child
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Injections, Intralesional
  • Male
  • Neuromuscular Agents / administration & dosage
  • Neuromuscular Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Salivation / drug effects
  • Sialorrhea / drug therapy*
  • Sialorrhea / etiology

Substances

  • Neuromuscular Agents
  • Botulinum Toxins, Type A