The causes of dysphagia in carcinoma of the lung

J R Soc Med. 2001 Nov;94(11):567-72. doi: 10.1177/014107680109401104.

Abstract

Dysphagia occurs in only a small percentage of patients with lung cancer, but the frequency of this cancer means that large numbers are affected. Non-quantitative analysis of a large Scottish series of lung cancer cases indicates the following eight broad categories of dysphagia according to underlying mechanisms: mediastinal disease; cervical lymphadenopathy; brainstem lesions; gastrointestinal tract metastases; associated systemic disorders; second primaries; oropharyngeal and oesophageal infections; and radiation-induced oesophageal toxicity.

Publication types

  • Case Reports

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Brain Stem Neoplasms / complications
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / complications*
  • Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung / radiotherapy
  • Carcinoma, Small Cell / complications*
  • Carcinoma, Small Cell / radiotherapy
  • Deglutition Disorders / etiology*
  • Esophageal Diseases / complications
  • Female
  • Gastrointestinal Neoplasms / complications
  • Humans
  • Lung Neoplasms / complications*
  • Lung Neoplasms / pathology
  • Lung Neoplasms / radiotherapy
  • Lymphatic Metastasis
  • Male
  • Mediastinal Neoplasms / complications
  • Middle Aged
  • Neoplasms, Second Primary / complications
  • Opportunistic Infections / complications
  • Pharyngeal Diseases / complications
  • Prospective Studies
  • Radiotherapy / adverse effects