Preventing the common cold with a garlic supplement: a double-blind, placebo-controlled survey

Adv Ther. Jul-Aug 2001;18(4):189-93. doi: 10.1007/BF02850113.

Abstract

One hundred forty-six volunteers were randomized to receive a placebo or an allicin-containing garlic supplement, one capsule daily, over a 12-week period between November and February. They used a five-point scale to assess their health and recorded any common cold infections and symptoms in a daily diary. The active-treatment group had significantly fewer colds than the placebo group (24 vs 65, P < .001). The placebo group, in contrast, recorded significantly more days challenged virally (366 vs 111, P < .05) and a significantly longer duration of symptoms (5.01 vs 1.52 days, P < .001). Consequently, volunteers in the active group were less likely to get a cold and recovered faster if infected. Volunteers taking placebo were much more likely to get more than one cold over the treatment period. An allicin-containing supplement can prevent attack by the common cold virus.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Anti-Infective Agents / administration & dosage*
  • Common Cold / prevention & control*
  • Dietary Supplements*
  • Female
  • Garlic
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Probability
  • Reference Values
  • Sulfinic Acids / administration & dosage*
  • Treatment Outcome

Substances

  • Anti-Infective Agents
  • Sulfinic Acids
  • allicin