Combined Vaginal-Cesarean Delivery of Twin Pregnancies

Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Dec;98(6):1032-7. doi: 10.1016/s0029-7844(01)01597-6.

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the incidence and factors associated with combined vaginal-cesarean delivery in twin pregnancies.

Methods: We studied all twin births weighing 500 g or more during a 20-year period (1980-1999) at a tertiary care center. Major anomalies, monoamniotic and conjoined twins, and antepartum fetal deaths were excluded.

Results: During this 20-year period, 105,987 women delivered, of whom 1565 (1.5%) had twins. Of these, 1151 twin sets fulfilled the study criteria. The mode of delivery was vaginal in 653 (56.8%), cesarean in 448 (38.9%), and vaginal-cesarean in 50 (4.3%). During the 20 years there was a statistically significant increase in combined vaginal-cesarean and elective cesarean deliveries, with a decrease in vaginal deliveries. Parity, gestational age, and birth weight discordance (>25%) were not associated with combined delivery. Compared with vaginal delivery, the nonvertex second twin was associated with a twofold higher risk of cesarean delivery (relative risk [RR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3, 3.8; P =.002); and an interdelivery interval of over 60 minutes with an eightfold higher risk (RR 8.2; CI 4.6,14.6; P <.001). Vaginal-cesarean delivery had a 22-fold higher use of general anesthesia compared with vaginal delivery (RR 21.8; CI 5.4, 88.5; P <.001).

Conclusion: There has been a significant increase in combined vaginal-cesarean and elective cesarean deliveries among twin gestations, with a decrease in vaginal births. Vaginal-cesarean delivery is associated with nonvertex second twin and a prolonged interdelivery interval.

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Cesarean Section / mortality
  • Delivery, Obstetric / mortality*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Medical Records
  • Nova Scotia / epidemiology
  • Pregnancy
  • Pregnancy Outcome*
  • Pregnancy, Multiple*
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Twins