The role of p53 and pRB in apoptosis and cancer

Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2002 Feb;12(1):60-6. doi: 10.1016/s0959-437x(01)00265-9.

Abstract

Loss of function of both the p53 pathway and the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway plays a significant role in the development of most human cancers. Loss of pRB results in deregulated cell proliferation and apoptosis, whereas loss of p53 desensitizes cells to checkpoint signals, including apoptosis. In the past two years, mouse genetics and gene expression profiling have led to major advances in our understanding of how the pRB and p53 pathways regulate apoptosis and thus the development of tumours.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Apoptosis / physiology*
  • Cell Cycle Proteins*
  • DNA-Binding Proteins / physiology
  • E2F Transcription Factors
  • Gene Expression Profiling
  • Genes, Tumor Suppressor
  • Humans
  • Inhibitor of Differentiation Protein 2
  • Mice
  • Neoplasms / etiology*
  • Neoplasms / genetics
  • Neoplasms / metabolism
  • Repressor Proteins*
  • Retinoblastoma Protein / genetics
  • Retinoblastoma Protein / physiology*
  • Transcription Factors / physiology
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / genetics
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53 / physiology*

Substances

  • Cell Cycle Proteins
  • DNA-Binding Proteins
  • E2F Transcription Factors
  • ID2 protein, human
  • Idb2 protein, mouse
  • Inhibitor of Differentiation Protein 2
  • Repressor Proteins
  • Retinoblastoma Protein
  • Transcription Factors
  • Tumor Suppressor Protein p53