Obesity does not portend a bad outcome for kidney transplant recipients

Transplantation. 2002 Jan 15;73(1):53-5. doi: 10.1097/00007890-200201150-00009.

Abstract

Background: Kidney transplant programs may avoid transplantation in obese patients because of reports indicating that obese patients have poorer outcomes than do nonobese patients. We recently reviewed our experience.

Methods: Patients receiving a kidney transplant between January 1, 1990 and December 31, 1999 were divided according to body mass index (BMI): group 1, BMI<25 (n=457); group 2, BMI> or =25 and <30 (n=278); and group 3, BMI> or =35 (n=98).

Results: Cadaveric graft survival rates at 2 years were 85% for group 1, 88% for group 2, and 85% for group 3 (P>0.10). Cadaveric patient survival rates at 2 years were 92% for group 1, 91% for group 2, and 94% for group 3 (P>0.10). There were no differences in technical losses or in posttransplantation wound complications. Group 3 patients, however, did have a higher incidence of steroid-induced posttransplantation diabetes mellitus than the other two groups (P<0.01).

Conclusion: Obese transplant recipients have similar outcomes to nonobese patients.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Body Mass Index*
  • Cadaver
  • Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
  • Ethnic Groups
  • Female
  • Florida
  • Graft Rejection / epidemiology
  • Graft Survival / physiology*
  • Hospitals, University
  • Humans
  • Kidney Transplantation / mortality
  • Kidney Transplantation / physiology*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Obesity / physiopathology*
  • Postoperative Complications / epidemiology
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Surgical Wound Infection / epidemiology
  • Survival Rate
  • Tissue Donors
  • Treatment Outcome