Cyclooxygenase-2: a therapeutic target

Annu Rev Med. 2002;53:35-57. doi: 10.1146/annurev.med.53.082901.103952.

Abstract

Cyclooxygenase (COX), also known as prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase, is the key enzyme required for the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. Two COX isoforms have been identified, COX-1 and COX-2. In many situations, the COX-1 enzyme is produced constitutively (e.g., in gastric mucosa), whereas COX-2 is highly inducible (e.g., at sites of inflammation and cancer). Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit both enzymes, and a new class of COX-2 selective inhibitors (COXIBs) preferentially inhibit the COX-2 enzyme. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of COX-1 and COX-2 in normal physiology and disease.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects
  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / therapeutic use*
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Cyclooxygenase 1
  • Cyclooxygenase 2
  • Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
  • Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / adverse effects
  • Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors / therapeutic use*
  • Humans
  • Inflammation / drug therapy*
  • Inflammation / enzymology
  • Isoenzymes / antagonists & inhibitors*
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Neoplasms / drug therapy*
  • Neoplasms / enzymology
  • Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases

Substances

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
  • Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors
  • Isoenzymes
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Cyclooxygenase 1
  • Cyclooxygenase 2
  • PTGS1 protein, human
  • PTGS2 protein, human
  • Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases