Antigen Presentation and T Cell Stimulation by Dendritic Cells

Annu Rev Immunol. 2002;20:621-67. doi: 10.1146/annurev.immunol.20.100301.064828. Epub 2001 Oct 4.

Abstract

Dendritic cells take up antigens in peripheral tissues, process them into proteolytic peptides, and load these peptides onto major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules. Dendritic cells then migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and become competent to present antigens to T lymphocytes, thus initiating antigen-specific immune responses, or immunological tolerance. Antigen presentation in dendritic cells is finely regulated: antigen uptake, intracellular transport and degradation, and the traffic of MHC molecules are different in dendritic cells as compared to other antigen-presenting cells. These specializations account for dendritic cells' unique role in the initiation of immune responses and the induction of tolerance.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Antigen Presentation*
  • Antigens, CD1 / metabolism
  • Cell Differentiation
  • Clinical Trials as Topic
  • Cross Reactions
  • Dendritic Cells / cytology
  • Dendritic Cells / immunology*
  • Endocytosis
  • Histocompatibility Antigens Class I / metabolism
  • Histocompatibility Antigens Class II / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Immune Tolerance
  • Immunotherapy
  • Lymphocyte Activation
  • Neoplasms / immunology
  • Neoplasms / therapy
  • Phagocytosis
  • Pinocytosis
  • Receptors, Cell Surface / immunology
  • Signal Transduction
  • T-Lymphocytes / immunology*

Substances

  • Antigens, CD1
  • Histocompatibility Antigens Class I
  • Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
  • Receptors, Cell Surface