The subcellular destinations of APC proteins

Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2002 May;3(5):328-38. doi: 10.1038/nrm806.

Abstract

Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an important tumour suppressor in the human colon, and is conserved in various organisms. Its best understood function is the destabilization of beta-catenin, a key effector of the Wnt signalling pathway. APC proteins are highly motile, and shuttle between several subcellular destinations. These destinations have prompted the discovery of new functions for the APC proteins, and this multitasking of APC might explain why its loss often leads to cancer.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / metabolism*
  • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli / physiopathology
  • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein / metabolism*
  • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein / physiology
  • Animals
  • Axin Protein
  • Cell Nucleus / metabolism
  • Cytoskeletal Proteins / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Mice
  • Microtubule-Associated Proteins / physiology
  • Microtubules / physiology
  • Protein Transport* / physiology
  • Proteins / physiology
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins / metabolism
  • Repressor Proteins*
  • Signal Transduction* / physiology
  • Trans-Activators*
  • Wnt Proteins
  • Zebrafish Proteins*
  • beta Catenin

Substances

  • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein
  • Axin Protein
  • CTNNB1 protein, human
  • CTNNB1 protein, mouse
  • Cytoskeletal Proteins
  • EB1 microtubule binding proteins
  • Microtubule-Associated Proteins
  • Proteins
  • Proto-Oncogene Proteins
  • Repressor Proteins
  • Trans-Activators
  • Wnt Proteins
  • Zebrafish Proteins
  • beta Catenin