Metabolism and the control of circadian rhythms

Annu Rev Biochem. 2002;71:307-31. doi: 10.1146/annurev.biochem.71.090501.142857. Epub 2001 Nov 9.

Abstract

The core apparatus that regulates circadian rhythm has been extensively studied over the past five years. A looming question remains, however, regarding how this apparatus is adjusted to maintain coordination between physiology and the changing environment. The diversity of stimuli and input pathways that gain access to the circadian clock are summarized. Cellular metabolic states could serve to link physiologic perception of the environment to the circadian oscillatory apparatus. A simple model, integrating biochemical, cellular, and physiologic data, is presented to account for the connection of cellular metabolism and circadian rhythm.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors
  • Biological Clocks / physiology*
  • Brain / cytology
  • Brain / physiology
  • CLOCK Proteins
  • Cells, Cultured
  • Circadian Rhythm / physiology*
  • Cryptochromes
  • Drosophila Proteins*
  • Eye Proteins / genetics
  • Eye Proteins / metabolism
  • Flavoproteins / genetics
  • Flavoproteins / metabolism
  • Glucose / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Liver / physiology
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins / metabolism
  • Neurons / metabolism
  • Oxidation-Reduction
  • Period Circadian Proteins
  • Photoreceptor Cells, Invertebrate*
  • Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled
  • Suprachiasmatic Nucleus / metabolism
  • Trans-Activators / genetics
  • Trans-Activators / metabolism
  • Transcription Factors / genetics
  • Transcription Factors / metabolism

Substances

  • Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors
  • Cryptochromes
  • Drosophila Proteins
  • Eye Proteins
  • Flavoproteins
  • NPAS2 protein, human
  • Nerve Tissue Proteins
  • PER1 protein, human
  • Period Circadian Proteins
  • Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled
  • Trans-Activators
  • Transcription Factors
  • cry protein, Drosophila
  • CLOCK Proteins
  • CLOCK protein, human
  • Glucose