Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Comparative Study
, 23 (3), 513-24

Molecular Systematics of the Jacks (Perciformes: Carangidae) Based on Mitochondrial Cytochrome B Sequences Using Parsimony, Likelihood, and Bayesian Approaches

Affiliations
Comparative Study

Molecular Systematics of the Jacks (Perciformes: Carangidae) Based on Mitochondrial Cytochrome B Sequences Using Parsimony, Likelihood, and Bayesian Approaches

David L Reed et al. Mol Phylogenet Evol.

Abstract

The Carangidae represent a diverse family of marine fishes that include both ecologically and economically important species. Currently, there are four recognized tribes within the family, but phylogenetic relationships among them based on morphology are not resolved. In addition, the tribe Carangini contains species with a variety of body forms and no study has tried to interpret the evolution of this diversity. We used DNA sequences from the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene to reconstruct the phylogenetic history of 50 species from each of the four tribes of Carangidae and four carangoid outgroup taxa. We found support for the monophyly of three tribes within the Carangidae (Carangini, Naucratini, and Trachinotini); however, monophyly of the fourth tribe (Scomberoidini) remains questionable. A sister group relationship between the Carangini and the Naucratini is well supported. This clade is apparently sister to the Trachinotini plus Scomberoidini but there is uncertain support for this relationship. Additionally, we examined the evolution of body form within the tribe Carangini and determined that each of the predominant clades has a distinct evolutionary trend in body form. We tested three methods of phylogenetic inference, parsimony, maximum-likelihood, and Bayesian inference. Whereas the three analyses produced largely congruent hypotheses, they differed in several important relationships. Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian methods produced hypotheses with higher support values for deep branches. The Bayesian analysis was computationally much faster and yet produced phylogenetic hypotheses that were very similar to those of the maximum-likelihood analysis.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 8 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

Publication types

Substances

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback