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. 2002 Jul;13(7):667-76.
doi: 10.1016/s1051-0443(07)61842-9.

Internal Iliac Artery Embolization With Bilateral Occlusion Before Endovascular Aortoiliac Aneurysm Repair-Clinical Outcome of Simultaneous and Sequential Intervention

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Internal Iliac Artery Embolization With Bilateral Occlusion Before Endovascular Aortoiliac Aneurysm Repair-Clinical Outcome of Simultaneous and Sequential Intervention

Christoph Engelke et al. J Vasc Interv Radiol. .

Abstract

Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the clinical outcome of patients after simultaneous or sequential internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization for bilateral IIA occlusion.

Materials and methods: Sixteen patients (65-88 y; mean, 75.6 y; two women), 11 with aortobiiliac aneurysms, three with bilateral common iliac artery (CIA)/IIA aneurysms, and two with unilateral CIA/IIA aneurysms, underwent IIA occlusion before endovascular aortoiliac repair. Eight patients underwent simultaneous bilateral IIA embolization before endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). Eight patients had sequential bilateral IIA occlusion. The outcome was assessed by clinical follow-up.

Results: There were no severe ischemic complications such as buttock necrosis or acute bowel, bladder, or spinal cord ischemia. Early ischemic complications occurred in 25% (buttock/thigh claudication, n = 3, 18.8%; and sexual dysfunction, n = 1, 6.2%) and had an onset not later than 6 months after intervention: buttock claudication resolved (n = 2) or persisted after aggravation by inferior mesenteric artery embolization for type II endoleak (n = 1). Impotence in a fourth patient persisted. The ischemic complication rate after 6 months was 30% (three of 10) because of a fifth patient who developed ischemic colitis with aggravation of ischemic heart disease after 15 months. The mean follow-up duration was 19.7 months. Patients with simultaneous embolization had a lower complication rate than those with sequential embolization (one of eight [12.5%] vs four of eight [50%], respectively).

Conclusions: IIA embolization for bilateral IIA occlusion can be performed with a complication rate comparable with results of previous studies of unilateral IIA embolization. Chronic buttock claudication may be aggravated by embolization of aortic side branches. Late complications can have an insidious course and be initiated by low-output cardiac failure. Bilateral IIA occlusion is recommended only in patients who are considered unfit for aortic surgery.

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