Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization by corneal epithelial cells involves MEK and ERK signal transduction proteins

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2002 Jul 16;213(1):73-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6968.2002.tb11288.x.

Abstract

Invasion of epithelial cells represents a potential pathogenic mechanism for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We explored the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MEK 1/2) and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2) in P. aeruginosa invasion. Treatment of corneal epithelial cells with MEK inhibitors, PD98059 (20 microM) or UO126 (100 microM), reduced P. aeruginosa invasion by approximately 60% without affecting bacterial association with the cells (P=0.0001). UO124, a negative control for UO126, had no effect on bacterial internalization. Infection of cells with an internalization-defective flhA mutant of P. aeruginosa was associated with less ERK 1/2 tyrosine phosphorylation than infection with wild-type invasive P. aeruginosa. An ERK-2 inhibitor, 5-iodotubercidin (20 microM), reduced P. aeruginosa invasion by approximately 40% (P=0.035). Together, these data suggest that P. aeruginosa internalization by epithelial cells involves a pathway(s) that includes MEK and ERK signaling proteins.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cells, Cultured
  • Epithelium, Corneal / microbiology*
  • Epithelium, Corneal / physiology
  • MAP Kinase Kinase 1
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases / physiology*
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases / physiology*
  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases / physiology*
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa / genetics
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa / physiology*
  • Rabbits
  • Signal Transduction / physiology*

Substances

  • Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
  • MAP Kinase Kinase 1
  • Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases