Multisite Phosphorylation Provides Sophisticated Regulation of Transcription Factors

Trends Biochem Sci. 2002 Dec;27(12):619-27. doi: 10.1016/s0968-0004(02)02207-7.

Abstract

Reversible phosphorylation is a prevalent mechanism by which the activity of eukaryotic transcription factors is regulated rapidly in response to changes in the cellular environment. Accumulated evidence has expanded the concept of phosphorylation to a process that provides dynamic and precise tuning of the transactivating potential of a factor, rather than being a static on/off switch. In the case of transcription factors such as heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), p53 and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), multisite phosphorylation enables several effects to operate within a single factor, thereby functioning as a key to signal integration. Studies on these transcription factors illustrate recent progress in solving the dynamic nature of transcriptional regulation by multisite phosphorylation.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • DNA-Binding Proteins / metabolism
  • Humans
  • NFATC Transcription Factors
  • Nuclear Proteins*
  • Phosphorylation
  • Protein Biosynthesis
  • Transcription Factors / chemistry
  • Transcription Factors / metabolism*
  • Transcriptional Activation

Substances

  • DNA-Binding Proteins
  • NFATC Transcription Factors
  • Nuclear Proteins
  • Transcription Factors