Remarkable Morphological Diversity of Viruses and Virus-Like Particles in Hot Terrestrial Environments

Arch Virol. 2002 Dec;147(12):2419-29. doi: 10.1007/s00705-002-0895-2.

Abstract

Electron microscopic studies of the viruses in two hot springs (85 degrees C, pH 1.5-2.0, and 75-93 degrees C, pH 6.5) in Yellowstone National Park revealed particles with twelve different morphotypes. This diversity encompassed known viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea, filamentous Lipothrixviridae, rod-shaped Rudiviridae, and spindle-shaped Fuselloviridae, and novel morphotypes previously not observed in nature. Two virus types resembled head-and-tail bacteriophages from the families Siphoviridae and Podoviridae, and constituted the first observation of these viruses in a hydrothermal environment. Viral hosts in the acidic spring were members of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Archaea / virology*
  • Archaeal Viruses / isolation & purification*
  • Archaeal Viruses / ultrastructure
  • Culture Media
  • Fuselloviridae / isolation & purification
  • Fuselloviridae / ultrastructure
  • Hot Temperature
  • Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
  • Lipothrixviridae / isolation & purification
  • Lipothrixviridae / ultrastructure
  • Microscopy, Electron
  • Podoviridae / isolation & purification*
  • Podoviridae / ultrastructure
  • Rudiviridae / isolation & purification
  • Rudiviridae / ultrastructure
  • Siphoviridae / isolation & purification
  • Siphoviridae / ultrastructure
  • Water Microbiology*
  • Wyoming

Substances

  • Culture Media