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Clinical Trial
. 2002 Oct;72(10):704-7.
doi: 10.1046/j.1445-2197.2002.02534.x.

Prospective Randomized Trial of Pre-Emptive Analgesics Following Ambulatory Inguinal Hernia Repair: Intravenous Ketorolac Versus Diclofenac Suppository

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Clinical Trial

Prospective Randomized Trial of Pre-Emptive Analgesics Following Ambulatory Inguinal Hernia Repair: Intravenous Ketorolac Versus Diclofenac Suppository

Hung Lau et al. ANZ J Surg. .

Abstract

Background: A pre-emptive non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is routinely given to patients undergoing ambulatory inguinal hernia repair. The present prospective randomized trial was undertaken to compare the efficacy of intravenous ketorolac and rectal diclofenac for ambulatory inguinal hernia repairs.

Methods: Between June 1999 and February 2001, a total of 108 patients who underwent ambulatory inguinal hernia repairs under general anaesthesia were recruited. Patients were randomized to receive either intravenous ketorolac 30 mg immediately prior to induction of general anaesthesia (n = 54) or rectal diclofenac 50 mg after signing consent at the Day Surgery Centre (n = 54).

Results: The demographic features, hernia types, anaesthetic time, dosage of anaesthetic medication and operative details of the two groups were comparable. There was no significant difference in total amount of analgesic consumption and linear analogue pain scores after operation. With regard to recovery variables, the respective times taken to regain ambulation and micturition were similar in both groups.

Conclusion: Diclofenac suppository 50 mg and intravenous ketorolac 30 mg provided equivalent postoperative analgesia following ambulatory inguinal hernia repair under general anaesthesia. Diclofenac suppository is an economical alternative to intravenous ketorolac. In the interests of cost containment rectal diclofenac could be considered the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug of choice for pre-emptive analgesia.

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    Standing JF, Savage I, Pritchard D, Waddington M. Standing JF, et al. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 Jul 2;2015(7):CD005538. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005538.pub3. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015. PMID: 26134060 Free PMC article. Review.

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