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Review
. 2002;17(4):297-310.

Agitation, Aggression, and Disinhibition Syndromes After Traumatic Brain Injury

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  • PMID: 12547978
Review

Agitation, Aggression, and Disinhibition Syndromes After Traumatic Brain Injury

Edward Kim. NeuroRehabilitation. .

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by disinhibition and aggression. These often profound changes in personality, present obstacles to rehabilitative treatments and community reentry. Syndromal presentations may involve a loss of impulse control, spontaneous aggression, and dysphoric bipolar states. Common neuropathological findings of inferior frontal lobe dysfunction support both disinhibition and kindling models of TBI-induced aggression. Assessment of these highly disruptive symptoms requires detailed historical, clinical, and neuropsychological information to formulate appropriate strategies. Management of TBI-related aggression may involve pharmacological, environmental, and psychotherapeutic strategies that incorporate caregiver training and support.

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