Effect of various doses of palm vitamin E and tocopherol on aspirin-induced gastric lesions in rats

Int J Exp Pathol. 2002 Dec;83(6):295-302. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2613.2002.00242.x.

Abstract

This study examined the effects of vitamin E on the prevention of aspirin-induced gastric lesions. The study was divided into two phases. Phase 1 determined the effects of various doses of palm vitamin E on the factors affecting mucosal integrity. Thirty-two male rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain (200-250 g) were randomly divided into four groups. Group I was fed a normal diet (control), Groups II, III and IV were fed a diet supplemented with palm vitamin E in a dose of 60 mg/kg food, 100 mg/kg food and 150 mg/kg food, respectively. The rats were killed after 4 weeks of feeding for the determination of gastric malondialdehyde (MDA), acid and mucus content. There was a significant decrease in gastric MDA and gastric acid in all the palm vitamin E supplemented groups compared to control. However, these doses of palm vitamin E had no significant effect on gastric mucus. The phase 2 study determined the effect of multiple doses of palm vitamin E and tocopherol on the prevention of aspirin-induced gastric lesions. Fifty rats of the same weight and strain were randomized into seven groups. Group I was fed a normal diet; groups II to IV were fed with a palm vitamin E enriched diet in doses of 60 mg, 100 mg and 150 mg/kg food, respectively; groups V to VII were fed with a tocopherol-enriched diet in doses of 20 mg, 30 mg and 50 mg/kg food, respectively. After 4 weeks of feeding with the respective diets the rats were challenged with a single intra-gastric dose of 400 mg/kg body weight aspirin suspended in propylene glycol. The rats were killed 6 h post-aspirin exposure for the determination of gastric lesion index and gastric parameters as mentioned in the phase I study. The gastric lesions index was significantly lower in all the vitamin E groups compared to control. The lowest ulcer index was observed in the groups that received 100 mg of palm vitamin E and 30 mg tocopherol in the diet. However, there was no significant difference in ulcer indices between palm vitamin E and tocopherol-treated groups. The lower ulcer index was only accompanied by lower gastric MDA content. We conclude that both palm vitamin E in doses of 60 mg, 100 mg and 150 mg/kg food as well as tocopherol in doses of 20 mg, 30 mg and 50 mg/kg food are equally effective in preventing aspirin-induced gastric lesions. The most probable mechanism is through their ability in limiting the lipid peroxidation that is involved in aspirin-induced gastric lesions.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal / adverse effects*
  • Aspirin / adverse effects*
  • Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
  • Gastric Mucosa / chemistry
  • Gastric Mucosa / pathology
  • Male
  • Malondialdehyde / analysis
  • Palm Oil
  • Phytotherapy / methods*
  • Plant Oils*
  • Random Allocation
  • Rats
  • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
  • Stomach Ulcer / chemically induced
  • Stomach Ulcer / pathology
  • Stomach Ulcer / prevention & control*
  • Time Factors
  • Tocopherols / therapeutic use
  • Vitamin E / therapeutic use*
  • Wound Healing

Substances

  • Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal
  • Plant Oils
  • Vitamin E
  • Malondialdehyde
  • Palm Oil
  • Tocopherols
  • Aspirin