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Review
, 23 (1), 47-55

[Behavioral and Pharmacological Studies of Juvenile Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats as an Animal Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder]

[Article in Japanese]
Affiliations
  • PMID: 12690641
Review

[Behavioral and Pharmacological Studies of Juvenile Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats as an Animal Model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder]

[Article in Japanese]
Ken-ichi Ueno et al. Nihon Shinkei Seishin Yakurigaku Zasshi.

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to evaluate juvenile stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) as an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD). Juvenile SHRSP showed significant increases in horizontal ambulatory activity and vertical rearing activity in the open field as compared with genetic control Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). Anxiety-related behavior assessed by elevated plus-maze as an index of impulsivity, the entries into open arms and the spent time in the open arms of SHRSP were significantly higher than those of WKY. Spontaneous alternation behavior requiring attention and working memory in the Y-maze was significantly impaired in male, but not female, SHRSP when compared with sex-matched WKY. Hippocampal long-term potentiation formation, a cellular model of learning and memory, was not impaired in SHRSP. Methylphenidate, a first choice psychostimulant for AD/HD, significantly alleviated the hyperactivity in SHRSP. However, intense impulsivity of SHRSP was not improved by methylphenidate. Methylphenidate dose-dependently and significantly ameliorated the impaired spontaneous alteration behavior in male SHRSP. These results suggest that juvenile male SHRSP manifest problematic behavior resembling ADHD, namely inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Methylphenidate alleviates the behavioral symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention. Thus, juvenile male SHRSP might be a useful behavioral animal model of AD/HD, from behavioral and pharmacological perspectives.

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